Played SLOW & LOOPED

Played SLOW & LOOPED

A playlist of all the available slow tempo and looped videos played by Kai Narezo. Most of the slow videos also have compás on the screen.

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Played SLOW & LOOPED
  • Friday Falseta - Fandangos de Huelva - Kai Narezo Falseta #1 - SLOW/LOOP

    An intermediate level Fandangos de Huelva falseta that features a bit of syncopation and a few little bursts of arpeggio. Works great as an intro, or you can use it anywhere in your Fandangos de Huelva.

  • Friday Falseta - Fandangos de Huelva - Pepe Habichuela Falseta - SLOW/LOOP

    A classic intermediate/advanced Fandangos de Huelva falseta by Pepe Habichuela. It features a lot of scales, but since the scales are phrased in triplets and not in 16th notes it’s not quite as technically challenging as it could be and actually quite playable.

  • Friday Falseta - Solea - Sabicas Falseta #1 - SLOW/LOOP

    This Sabicas Soleá falseta will not only work both hands but will also really work the coordination between the two hands. Plus it’s one of the all-time great Soleá falsetas that works at any tempo. Traditional definitely doesn’t always mean easy!

  • Friday Falseta - Solea - Ramon Montoya Falseta #1 - SLOW/LOOP

    This classic Soleá falseta by the great Ramon Montoya starts out quite elegantly and then ends with a bang. It’s also a fantastic left-hand workout, and it has a little quirk, in that it has an “extra” six beats (don’t worry, we explain why and also how to remedy the situation if needed).

  • Friday Falseta - Tangos Por Arriba Falseta by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    Tangos can be played in many keys, and after Por Medio, the most common other key is Por Arriba (E Phrygian), the key that Tangos de Granada is often played in. Here’s a fun falseta that can be played as written, but also has a lot of moving parts that you can use as shorter falsetas or simply to...

  • Friday Falseta - Colombiana Falseta #1 by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    This intermediate/advanced Colombianas falseta follows a more or less traditional chord progression you’ll want to be familiar with when playing Colombianas. You can use our Tangos compás loops to practice this one: https://learn.flamencoexplained.com/compas-loops/season:5

  • Friday Falseta - Guajira Falseta #2 by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    Here’s an advanced Guajiras falseta that works at both faster and slower tempos and involves quite a few little scale bursts for you to work on. Could also work as a somewhat rubato intro at a slower speed.

  • Friday Falseta - Bulerias Thumb Falseta/Tag by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    A fun falseta that can also be used a tag for something else, this one starts just before beat 12 and features quite a bit of thumb technique as well as some precise left-hand movement.

  • Friday Falseta - Tangos Traditional Line Cliche by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    A line cliche is when one note within a chord moves by half-steps. The second half of this falseta features a line cliche on the D minor chord where the bass note moves down from the note D on the fifth string. This is a traditional figure that you’ll probably recognize more once you learn to pla...

  • Friday Falseta - Alegrias Escobilla Variation by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    Here’s a fun fasleta that’s relatively straightforward and will add variety to your Escobilla por Alegrias. The right hand is all P-M-A and the melody is mostly scale wise motion, using an E Major scale in the 6th position. It’s almost all triplets, so once you have the right hand down it’s all a...

  • Friday Falseta - Bulerias Falseta Por Fiesta by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    I say this one is good Por Fiesta because it’s all thumb so you can play it loud and, once learned, should be playable at quick speeds. Watch out for those pickup notes at the beginning, though, as it starts just after beat 10.

  • Friday Falseta - Tangos Alzapua Workout #2 by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    This Tangos falseta features a very common alzapua burst and quite a bit of left-hand / right-hand coordination to make it sound its best. Also, watch out for the rhythm change from 16th to 8th notes.

  • Friday Falseta - Seguirilla Faster Escobilla Falseta by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    This Seguirilla falseta works best at faster speeds, making it useful for Escobillas or any other time you need a fast-tempo falseta. You’ll want to watch out for the compás, and also for the left hand, which needs to leave space for adjacent open strings to ring. As always, simple doesn’t mean e...

  • Friday Falseta - Alegrias Slur Falseta by Kai Narezo - SLOW / LOOP

    Played slow and looped: a short but tricky Alegrias falseta that will really work both your left hand and your compás. In addition to some 16th note slurs that include a lot of pinky action, the phrases don’t quite resolve where we would expect them to. Once you’ve learned the notes, make sure yo...

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 3 - Thumb Falseta by Paco de Lucia - TUTORIAL

    We had to include at least on Paco de Lucia falseta in the course, and this one seems to have been one of Paco’s favorites, given how often he played it. There’s a lot going on, both rhythmically and technically, so take this one slow and make sure you understand where each phrase starts and stop...

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 2 - 2-Compás Pattern The Trill - TUTORIAL

    This 2-compás passage seems to confuse just about everyone at first, so we break it down in a way that should be easy to follow. Take it slowly and pay attention to the details and you can be one of the ones who gets it right!

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 3 - Remate by Vicente Amigo - SLOW & LOOPED

    Played at 140bpm and looped. While perhaps not technically a falseta (there’s no real definition that I know of, but this feels like a bit less than a falseta), this is a great little bit to throw in between falsetas or after the singer has finished a letra. Check out the way the melody connects ...

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 3 - Picado Falseta by Enrique Melchor - SLOW & LOOPED

    This picado falseta by Enrique Melchor features both the symmetric diminished scale, which is a staple of modern flamenco, and diminished arpeggios, which are somewhat more traditional. You may find you disagree with the fingerings given, which is fine if you find an easier way for you to play th...

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 3 - Picado Falseta by Moraíto - PLAYED SLOW & LOOPED

    Played slower at 140bpm and looped. Not only is this a great-sounding Bulerías falseta, it’s also a fantastic picado burst exercise. It also features some interesting phrasing and syncopation, so stay focused!

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 3 - Thumb Falseta by Paco de Lucia - SLOW & LOOPED

    Played slow at 140 bpm and looped. We had to include at least on Paco de Lucia falseta in the course, and this one seems to have been one of Paco’s favorites, given how often he played it. There’s a lot going on, both rhythmically and technically, so take this one slow and make sure you understan...

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 3 - A Minor Falseta by Sabicas - PLAYED SLOW & LOOPED

    Sabicas was famous for his minor Bulerías, and this may be his most famous falseta of all. It’s almost all picado in eight notes, and the phrases start on beat 1 and 7 instead of the more common beats 12 and 6.

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 3 - Good For Intro Falseta by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    This Bulerías Falseta combines arpeggio, picado, thumb and some left-hand stretches into a somewhat longer falseta than we’ve seen. It can be used as an introduction but also works anywhere else you’d play a falseta.

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 3 - ArpegScaleThumb Falseta by Kai Narezo - SLOW/LOOP

    This Bulerías falseta starts out with a Major 7 sound (the Vicente Amigo influence) that combines arpeggio and picado, but it ends with a driving thumb figure that changes the energy of the falseta - and that can also be used on its own.

  • Bulerias Explained - Level 2 - Arpeggio Falseta by Viejín - PLAYED SLOW & LOOPED

    This arpeggio falseta features some beautiful chords - and melodies within each chord - as well as some tricky syncopated anticipations of the downbeat of each phrase. You can also play the chord progression with rasgueados rather than arpeggios, or you can do both, as we do here.